The applicant sylvia plath analysis. Analysis of Sylvia Plath’s The Applicant 251 words 2019-01-09

The applicant sylvia plath analysis Rating: 8,4/10 313 reviews

Sylvia Plath: Poems Study Guide

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

Here the imagery is slightly more comical, as Plath calls to mind an overripe piece of fruit meandering down the street on leg-like vines. The two images, of an elephant and a ponderous house, contained in the second line of Metaphors both refer to form. The second reason this is an appropriate metaphor is the yeast. She is bound for an unknown destination and unable to stop. The question is: Is this a disembodied hand? The last line, line 40, hammers home the message of the matrimonial market. The second reason this is an appropriate metaphor is the yeast.


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Sylvia Plath’s “The Applicant”

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

As Sylvia Plath herself explained: 'In this poem. Here is a hand To fill it and willing To bring teacups and roll away headaches And do whatever you tell it. Will you marry it, marry it, marry it. But Plath personifies them in order to establish a deep bond with them. On close examination, it implies that Plath was at least somewhat ambivalent about giving birth. In spite of the fact that he was a very strict father, that was a real tragedy for Sylvia. Stanza 8 The climax to the poem has the speaker in a slightly desperate mode.

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Sylvia Plath: Poems Summary

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

In the final metaphor of the piece on the last line line 9 , Plath describes a feeling of helplessness. Now your head, excuse me, is empty. We make new stock from the salt. Domestically this woman, doll, wife, has all the skills. Come here, sweetie, out of the closet. You have an eye, it's an image. I love how this poem puts the reader in the position of the applicant in an interview; we are being forcefully interrogated by the speaker and the tone is extremely arresting.

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Analysis of Metaphors by Sylvia Plath

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

End rhyme in this quote gives the suit an even more exciting and catchy appeal. I think that it is a really effective poem, and I love the way it is addressed to the reader. The Applicant, a free verse poem, has 8 stanzas, 40 lines in total, each stanza being a quintain 5 lines. The women is shown to us as a bit of a robot. My boy, it's your last resort.

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Sylvia Plath: Poems Summary

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

I have the ticket for that. Context: This part of the poem explanation is absolutely indispensable to the construction of its meaning. Marriage, therefore, is portrayed as an absurdly narrow existence perpetrated by weak men and obliviously tolerant women within cultural paradigms. In this respect she is one wit the applicant who likewise has no voice. So my opinion is that unlike many famous poems, this one is a weak attempt to put a sub-standard opinion across. Come here, sweetie, out of the closet. Before that she sealed the door between herself and the children with wet towels and left a note to her neighbor.

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Sexism/Feminism on Sylvia Plath by Elizabeth Ezzelle on Prezi

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

Again, the fruit is a metaphor for her unborn child. I think that the poem is well written and not only sows how women were expected to act to be the perfect wife but at the same time illustrates the pressure men were under to get the perfect woman to be seen as an upstanding man in society. Or is he a kind of misfit? I think that the poem is well written and not only sows how women were expected to act to be the perfect wife but at the same time illustrates the pressure men were under to get the perfect woman to be seen as an upstanding man in society. Plath also calls marriage the man’s “last resort,” implying the impotence or incompleteness for which the woman would be able to compensate. The enjambment now ends and the reader has to pause at each end line which, with the addition of more punctuation, slows things down. First, are you our sort of a person? This metaphor is particularly apt for a couple of reasons. Conclusion Notice that by the poem's final line, the repeated question, 'Will you marry it, marry it, marry it', although still seemingly phrased as a question, no longer has a question mark at the end.

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Analysis of by Sylvia Plath

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

In 1957 Sylvia went back to Massachusetts where she met a poet Ann Sexton they both studied with Robert Lowell. Plath chose not to reveal herself as the author: she published the book under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas. Structure While this poem is written in free verse, it is nonetheless highly structured. The poet was known, in part, for being beautiful, after all. Naked as paper to start But in twenty-five years she'll be silver, In fifty, gold.


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Analysis of the Poem by Sylvia Plath

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

There was a lack of stability and an abundance of senseless destruction. Naked as paper to start But in twenty-five years she'll be silver, In fifty, gold. Today, most people in America have a light weight, easy to use credit card that is a very tempting spending tool. Will you marry it, marry it, marry it. In other words, they have to be rigid, stoic, invincible, and must keep up this guise even unto the day they die. The swollen belly becomes an oversized melon, with slender, twig like legs holding up the added baby weight. ” The feminist movement in the nineteen sixties inspired much of Sylvia Plath’s disgust at women’s oppression and how they are victims in a male-dominant society.

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Biography and poems of Sylvia Plath Biography

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

It is waterproof, shatterproof, proof Against fire and bombs through the roof. The two images, of an elephant and a ponderous house, contained in the second line of Metaphors both refer to form. Will you marry it, marry it, marry it. Telling a man that he needs someone to do things that he could do himself can also be degrading. This perspective was later challenged by feminist critics, but remains a frequent understanding of her work.

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Analysis of Sylvia Plath’s The Applicant 251 words

the applicant sylvia plath analysis

As the title implies, it consists of a list of several seemingly unconnected metaphors. Heroic actors in the media, who never seem to die no matter how much trouble they face, have been looked up to as the ideal man. Stanza 5 The applicant, the male, is naked, just like Adam in the old testament. Now your head, excuse me, is empty. To her it has become a practical rather than emotional bond; it has entered the realm of an “applicant” rather than a partner or spouse. The allusion to pregnancy is more obvious here pregnant woman could reasonably be said to house her child, after all.

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