To autumn analysis line by line. What Does the Poem by John Keats Mean? 2019-02-22

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Analysis of To Autumn by John Keats

to autumn analysis line by line

So the line means that summer has made the nuts and flowers and all the harvest of summer grow until it bursts. Life must be lived without warning; it is not to be taken for granted. Middle You also anticipate the coming of the next season. The sounds of autumn are the wailing of gnats, the bleating of lambs, the singing of hedge crickets, the whistling of robins, and the twittering of swallows. If spring has its songs, autumn too has its sounds and songs. The line emphasises the harmony of autumn and this effect, which is used throughout the poem, could also be a metaphor for the slow down of life in autumn.

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To Autumn: Stanza 1 Summary

to autumn analysis line by line

The first stanza is one long sentence, taking in cosmic sun and microcosmic bee and cell, building into a heaped and humming climax, onomatopoeia filling the last line. From nature's perspective, fruit is the mechanism for planting new seeds. The description of the landscape is perfect. It surprises the reader with the unusual idea that autumn is a season to rejoice. There is no turning back the clock. This poem has lots of hard words in it and some grammar difficulties, so you can learn a heap of English from this. Autumn is personified and is perceived in a state of activity.

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Ode to Autumn by John Keats: Summary and Analysis

to autumn analysis line by line

Keats's declining health and personal responsibilities also raised obstacles to his continuing poetic efforts. She sits on the granary, and her hair is lifted by a gentle wind. I really enjoyed this exceptional poem by Keats. Keats also alludes to a certain unpleasantness connected to Autumn, and links it to a time of death. In the final stanza, autumn is seen as a musician, and the music which autumn produces is as pleasant as the music of spring — the sounds of gnats, lambs, crickets, robins and swallows. The songs and joys of spring are not found in Autumn seasons.

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William Blake’s TO AUTUMN

to autumn analysis line by line

The granary is where the harvest would be stored, but autumn is not bringing in the grain. In the first stanza, the poet describes the fruits of autumn, the fruits coming to maturity in readiness for harvesting. The Autumn holds a sickle in its hand. The imagery starts out very tactile; then fades out to more visual words. The hazel-shells also grow plumb. There are only plants and animals, apart from the Autumn goddess of course.

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Ode to Autumn Summary Analysis

to autumn analysis line by line

Keats was very aware that he was writing in a tradition and he was ambitious enough to want to stand among the great English poets. Abroad means in other countries. New York: , 1985, pp. Autumn coming between summer and winter, can be seen as the intensifying and prolonging of summer. For instance, bend, fill, swell, plump, and clammy show this tactile imagery. The stubble-fields looked better than they did in spring.

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Ode to Autumn by John Keats: Summary and Analysis

to autumn analysis line by line

Line 7: To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells The gourd becomes big and full. In this approach to Nature he remains the great artist that he was. A good example of this are the lines,' And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;. Also, noted by both Bate and Jennifer Wagner, the structure of the verse reinforces the sense of something to come; the placing of the couplet before the end of each stanza creates a feeling of suspension, highlighting the theme of continuation. Looks like we might have to separate the two of them. The use of the run-on line in the first stanza, for instance, is noteworthy.

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To Autumn

to autumn analysis line by line

Traditionally, the water-meadows south of Winchester, along which Keats took daily leisurely walks, were assumed to have provided the sights and sounds of his ode. The poem celebrates autumn as a season of abundance, a season of reflection, a season of preparation for the winter, and a season worthy of admiration with comparison to what romantic poetry often focuses upon - the spring. John Keats wrote in a letter to a friend, Leigh Hunt: 'We hate poetry that has a palpable design upon us. Plump means to become full. Line 3, granary: a storehouse for grain, often after it has been threshed. Obviously Keats had recognised the almost cliché use of spring, as new life in romantic poetry, and of the poetry before this era.


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To Autumn

to autumn analysis line by line

In each stanza, the first part is made up of the first four lines of the stanza, and the second part is made up of the last seven lines. Line 8: With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, Kernel is the core or centre of the hazelnuts. Besides, he is starting to get away from the point. Undercurrents of Influence in English Romantic Poetry. In the first stanza, Keats concentrates on the sights of autumn, ripening grapes and apples, swelling gourds and hazel nuts, and blooming flowers. John Keats: His Life and Poetry.


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SparkNotes: Keats’s Odes: To Autumn, page 2

to autumn analysis line by line

In this stanza Keats uses powerful adjectives to portray the English autumn. In The Persistence of Poetry. To Autumn is, in a sense, a return to the mood of the Ode on Indolence-«making the moment sufficient to itself. The Sun and the autumn help the flowers of the summer to continue. Harvested field, Hampshire In the second stanza Autumn is as a harvester, to be seen by the viewer in various guises performing labouring tasks essential to the provision of food for the coming year.

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To Autumn: Stanza 1 Summary

to autumn analysis line by line

Stanza 3 The second and third questions appear, asking about the inspirational music of Spring. The progression through the day is revealed in actions that are all suggestive of the drowsiness of afternoon: the harvested grain is being winnowed, the harvester is asleep or returning home, the last drops issue from the cider press. Keats is here able to suggest the prudent hesitation of the man or woman carefully balancing his load before he crosses the brook. There is a rich bountifulness of food of the season. The fading away of the imagery compares to life fading or slipping away.

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